HOW TO GROW THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo

How to grow the Strawberry tree - Arbutus unedo



The Strawberry Tree (sometimes known as the Irish or Killarney Strawberry Tree) - Arbutus unedo is a gorgeous, evergreen tree from the Ericaceae family. Despite its Ericaceae background, the strawberry tree is surprisingly lime tolerant.

There are a number of cultivars available notably 'Elfin King', 'Integerrima', 'Quercifolia' and 'Rubra'.

Strawberry tree bark
You can plant the strawberry tree in October, or if you miss this opportunity from March to May, in a moist but well-drained soil. While Arbutus unedo and it cultivars are known to be lime tolerant, they will still perform best in a good, lime-free, loam. However, despite being in the ericaceae family they have proven to be surprisingly tolerant of chalky and limey soils. They will need a sunny position but keep them a sheltered position away from cold northern and eastern winds.

Be aware that the young plants can be particularly tender and will require winter protection of bracken or straw. Once they have established they will be able to withstand greater cold and exposure.

You should not prune your strawberry tree as this can quickly ruin its ornamental habit, although straggly shoots may be cut back to the main stems in April.

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HOW TO GROW A CONKER TREE FROM A CONKER
HOW TO GROW THE FRANGIPANI TREE- Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia
HOW TO GROW FRANGIPANI TREE FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW GINKGO BILOBA - The Maidenhair Tree
HOW TO GROW THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo
HOW TO GROW THE STRAWBERRY TREE FROM SEED
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HOW TO GROW THE WALNUT TREE
How to take Cuttings from Strawberry Plants
HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS FROM THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo
LABURNUM ALPINUM
LABURNUM WATERERI 'ALFORDS WEEPING'
LABURNUM x WATERERI 'VOSSII'
THE CANARY ISLAND TREE DANDELION
THE FIREWHEEL TREE - Stenocarpus sinuatus
THE MARBLE BERRY - Pollia Condensata
THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo
WALNUT TREES

Main image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license Lucarelli.

HOW TO GROW THE MEXICAN SUNFLOWER FROM SEED

How to grow the Mexican sunflower from seed




WANT TO BUY HARDY EXOTIC PLANT SEEDS? THEN CLICK HERE FOR THE 'SEEDS OF EADEN' SEED SHOP

The Mexican sunflower - Tithonia rotundifolia is a gorgeous summer flowering half-hardy annual and while it may not particularly well known in European gardens its make for a stunning addition to any herbaceous or exotic border.

How to grow the Mexican sunflower from seed - http://pics.davesgarden.com/
You can sow Mexican sunflower seeds from February to March. Using either 3 inch pots or modular seeds trays fill with a good quality seed compost such as John Innes 'Seed and Cutting'. Lay the seed on the surface at a rate of one seeds per module or three seeds per 3 inch pot. Water gently by lowering the tray or pots into a bowl of water and allow the water to rise through the compost naturally. The compost will be wet enough once the surface changes colour.

Give the seeds a light covering of vermiculite, but do not exclude light from the seeds as they require light to help initiate germination.

Place the tray or pots in a heated propagator at an optimum temperature of 20-25 Celsius. Alternatively, seal inside a clear polythene bag and keep in a warm place such a bright windowsill - but one that does not receive direct sunlight. Keep the compost moist by watering with a fine hand-held mister or sprayer when necessary.

How to grow the Mexican sunflower from seed
You can expect germination to occur within 7-21 days, at which point the tray or post can be removed from the propagator or polythene bag.

When they are large enough to handle, transplant the seedlings into individual 3 inch pots taking care to minimise any damage to the roots.

Keep them under protection for a few more weeks and once they have established they can be hardened off and planted outside, but only once all risk of frost has passed. If you are planting in groups space them 30cm apart in a sunny, well-drained spot in the garden. While the mexican sunflower is not particularly prone to damage from most pests and disease they will need to be protected from damage by slugs and snails.

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WHEN DO YOU HARVEST SWEET POTATOES?

When do you harvest sweet potatoes - http://www.veggiegardeningtips.com/




Sweet potatoes will be ready to harvest in late summer, approximately 12 to 16 weeks after first being planted, but this doesn't mean they need to be lifted immediately as the flavour and quality of a sweet potato crop will improve with the oncoming colder weather. In addition you will also have larger tubers.

When do you harvest sweet potatoes -http://hickeryhollerfarm.blogspot.co.uk/
The tubers can grow a foot or more away from the plant, so make sure that you give the give plenty of space when lifting in order to prevent nicking and damaging the skin from the lifting tool. Any damage to the surface of the tuber can encourage fungal infections which will spoil the crop. Wait until the soil is dry before lifting your crop as sweet potatoes covered in wet mud are much more difficult to dry off in the sun.

Dry the freshly dug sweet potatoes in the sun for several hours before move them to a curing room. Although there are no problems with cooking sweet potatoes fresh from the ground, they sweetness of their flavour will improves after curing. Proper curing will also help the tubers heals and skin damage incurred during harvest and improves their ability to store.

The easiest way to cure sweet potatoes is to place them in newspaper-lined boxes. Next, place the boxes in a warm, well-ventilated room at approximately 30-35 degrees Celsius with about 85 percent humidity, and keep them there for a week or so. After curing, move the sweet potatoes to a cooler position when they can be stored 12-15 degrees Celsius and a humidity, of 75 to 80 percent. Once stored they should be eaten with a month.

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HOW TO GROW SWEET POTATOES
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HOW TO GROW THE FRANGIPANI TREE- Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia

How to grow the Frangipani tree, Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia




Commonly known as the Frangipani tree, Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia is a deciduous plant native to tropical and subtropical regions of Mexico, Central America, Colombia and Venezuela. It is an ornamental flowering tree with a spreading habit, growing up to 7–8 m in both height and width. There is some variation in the flowers from tree to tree ranging from shades of pink, white and yellow. The flowers themselves are highly fragrant and are produced in large quantities over the summer and autumn.

The Frangipani tree - Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia illustration
The common name 'frangipani' comes from an Italian noble family, but specifically a sixteenth-century marquess of which invented a plumeria-scented perfume. The Frangipani family was a powerful Roman patrician clan who rose to the height of their wealth and power during in the Middle Ages.

To grow the Frangipani tree you will need to be able to provide a frost free climate where temperatures do not drop much below 18 degrees Celsius over the winter. They will tolerate a wide variety of soils, from acid to alkaline and sandy to clay just so long as they are free-draining. Heavier clay soils will need their drainage improved or alternatively consider growing the Frangipani tree in a large container.

In cooler climate you can grow the Frangipani tree quite successfully in pots where they will flower reliably every summer. Just choose a quality potting mix such as John Innes No.3 and a wide, shallow pot. You may wish to mix in some horticultural grit or sand to the compost in order to improve the drainage further.Just remember that potted plants will require more frequent watering than those grown in the ground.

Thee Frangipani tree - Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia
Plant the Frangipani tree in a sunny position, and water only during the spring and summer. You should and hold off completely during the cooler months as they can be prone to root, branch and tip rot if conditions become increasingly cold and wet. They are also tolerant to a certain amount of salt spray making them ideal for planting in coastal conditions

The Frangipani tree rarely need feeding, although they will produce bigger and better flowers if you spread a mulch of well-rotted farm manure or a sprinkling of granular fertiliser around the base of the tree during spring and summer. Be aware that any mulch applied should be kept away from the trunk to avoid rot.

Once established you will find that the Frangipani tree is both drought tolerant and also surprisingly fire hardy!

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HOW TO GROW THE FRANGIPANI TREE- Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia
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HOW TO GROW GINKGO BILOBA - The Maidenhair Tree
HOW TO GROW THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo
LABURNUM ALPINUM
LABURNUM WATERERI 'ALFORDS WEEPING'
LABURNUM x WATERERI 'VOSSII'
 THE AFRICAN TULIP TREE - Spathodea campanulata
THE CANARY ISLAND TREE DANDELION
THE FIREWHEEL TREE - Stenocarpus sinuatus
THE FRANGIPANI TREE - Plumeria rubra
THE HEAVEN LOTUS TREE - Gustavia superba
THE MIMOSA TREE - Acacia dealbata
THE MONKEY PUZZLE TREE - Araucaria araucana
THE SILVER BIRCH - Betula pendula
THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo

HOW TO GROW ABUTILON 'KENTISH BELLE'

How to grow Abutilon 'Kentish Belle'





The Abutilon genus contains approximately 100 species of half hardy and tender annuals, perennials, evergreen shrubs and small trees however, the one cultivar that you are most likely to find in the United Kingdom is Abutilon 'Kentish Belle'.

Abutilon 'Kentish Belle' is a gorgeous, ornamental, summer-flowering shrub that will grow to a height and spread of between 1.5 and 2.5 metres. It is compact, semi-evergreen with arching shoots and three-lobed, triangular-ovate leaves. The flowers of 'Kentish Belle' are a little special, each one is 4-5cm in length, bell-shaped, with orange-yellow petals boldly contrasting with a dark red calyx

How to grow Abutilon 'Kentish Belle'
It will grow outside in any ordinary, well-drained soil. It will do best in full sun, but will tolerate light-shade so long as the site is sheltered and warm. Water freely during the growing season, but reduce this down to being kept just moist for the rest of the year.

While the Abutilon 'Kentish Belle' mixed heritage belongs to the tropical regions of south America its hybridization has made it cold hardier than the other species and cultivated varieties.

However, its tolerance to cold and frosts only goes so far and will only allow it to remain planted outside in the milder, southernmost regions of the United Kingdom. Even so it is advisable to provide dried bracken fronds or straw as winter protection in all but the mildest districts

Regarding pruning, remove frosted and dead shoots from outdoor plants in March or April.

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Abutilon 'Kentish Belle'
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THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo
WINTERSWEET - Chimonanthus praecox

HOW TO GROW JAPANESE PAINTED FERNS

How to grow Japanese painted ferns



The Japanese painted fern has arguably some of the best ornamental foliage of all garden ferns. Fully hardy and suitable for both partial and heavy shade this gorgeous deciduous perennial is a must for anyone with a passion for the exotic.

How to grow Japanese painted ferns
It is a steady growing, mound forming species that will reach a height and spread of approximately 18 inches. The deeply cut foliage is grey-green with touches of silver, burgundy, purple and even turquoise. There a number of excellent cultivars to choose from notably:

Athyrium niponicum 'Red Beauty' is a particular favourite withs yellow fronds and a bright red stem.

Athyrium niponicum 'Ursula's Red' is a rarely seen cultivar but possibly the most striking with a wide, near-black band running along the central stem surrounded by a silvery-pink margin.

Athyrium niponicum 'Pictum' has pale silvery-green fronds and a bright red stem.

Athyrium niponicum 'Pictum Cristatum' is similar to the regular 'Pictum' cultivar but with the addition of crested fronds.

Athyrium niponicum 'Metallicum' produces eye-catching, variegated silver, green and red foliage.

How to grow Japanese painted ferns
While Japanese painted fern will do best in a semi or fully-shaded position they will show the best colouration is they are subjected to a certain amount of direct light. Of course, give the Japanese painted fern too much light and the fronds will begin to scorch.

Japanese painted ferns will thrive in a neutral to acidic, humus-rich soil. They will like to be kept moist all year round although they will benefit from drying out slightly between waterings. Once established they can become surprisingly drought tolerant.

Plant in a damp, reasonably drained soil and add plenty of humus rich compost such as leaf mould or well-rotted pine needles before hand. Avoid mulching with fertiliser-rich manures and instead provide a spring mulch of moss peat. In cooler northern European climates you may need to provide a dry winter protection of straw or bracken.

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HOW TO GROW SPIDER LILIES

How to grow Spider Lilies

Spider lilies, Hymenocallis species and cultivars, are some of the few great, late summer-flowering bulbs that you can get for the northern European garden and despite their tropical and subtropical origins you can have them flowering in your cold English plot provided you adhere to a few cultivation techniques.

How to grow Spider Lilies
Pre-pack spider lily bulbs will be available in the autumn and should be planted any time from November to January. Plant each bulb into a 6-8 inch pot containing a good quality compost such as John Innes 'No 2'. The neck of each bulb should be just above the surface of the compost. For early flowering species such as Hymenocallis amancaes, Hymenocallis calathina and Hymenocallis x macro stephana maintain a temperature of 13- 16 degrees Celsius.

Later flowering species such as Hymenocallis x festalis and Hymenocallis harrisiana will only need to be kept frost free with a winter temperature of between 3-5 degrees Celsius.

Give spider lilies a diluted, half strength liquid feed at fortnightly intervals from April to August, and shade the greenhouse lightly during the hottest months of the year. They can be watered freely during the growing season but over the winter they will need to be kept just on the moist side. The is one exception which is the evergreen hybrid Hymenocallis x macrostephana. This particular specimen will need to be kept moist at all time.

With all spider lilies, remove and dispose of any dead leaves from both evergreen and deciduous species and cultivars. They can be potted on every second or third year in April, again using John Innes 'No 2'. Those plant which are not being re-potted can be given a given a top-dressing using any good quality compost.

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THE TURK'S CAP LILY - Lilium martagon

HARDY SPIDER LILIES

Hardy Soider lilies - http://photos.linternaute.com/


Spider lilies are a group of gorgeous, ornamental flowering bulbs from the Hymenocallis genus. They are mostly from the tropical or subtropical Americas, which means that on the whole they are not hardy enough to be a permanent fixture in the far cooler, northern European gardens. Of course you can grow them as a protected crop and keep them in a frost-free environment over-winter but this involves growing them in pots and bringing them in and out of glasshouse conditions as the seasons dictate.

Hardy Soider lilies - http://www.mtcubacenter.org/
However there are two spider lilies that are just hardy enough to leave outside all-year-round just so long as you can provide a suitably warm and sheltered position.

The first is the North American species Hymenocallis occidentalis which is found as far north as southwestern Indiana where winters can reach temperatures as low as −18 °C. Hymenocallis occidentalis will bloom late in the summer and depending both the plant and its growing conditions the leaves can either be absent or present at bloom time.

The second is a hybrid between Hymenocallis calathina and Elisena longipetala known as Hymenocallis x festalis. This particular cultivar can be planted outside in sheltered parts of south and western England, but it must still be protected against frosts.

Plant each bulb about 5 inches deep and 12 inches apart. Like regular spider lilies they will need good drainage and will grow well in a soil rich with organic matter mixed well in. It is also worth adding a controlled release fertiliser such as osmocote to the immediate soil before planting. Both examples prefer a sunny position, but they will tolerate a certain amount of shade around midday.

During the growing season keep the soil on the moist side and feed with a water soluble fertiliser every 710 days.

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The Hardy Spider Lily
The Stargazer Lily

SPIDER LILY - Hymenocallis species and cultivars

Spider lily - Hymenocallis species and cultivars



Spider lilies are a group of some 60 plants from the Hymenocallis genus. The 'Spider' part of its rather unusual common name refers to the curious shape of the flowers which consist of six narrow, curved petals attached to a shallow cup that is formed from the fused stamens. The scented flowers are somewhat daffodile-like.

Spider lily - Hymenocallis species and cultivars
Native to tropical and subtropical America, spider lilies are herbaceous bulbous perennials whose natural habitats include grasslands, wetlands and rocky outcrops. Unfortunately, for those of us who live in northern European climates most Hymenocallis species and cultivars will need to be grown in a warm greenhouse or in a sheltered sunny spot where the ground doesn't freeze. There is one species however that will tolerate colder climates and that is the North American species Hymenocallis occidentalis. This particular species is found as far north as southwestern Indiana where winters can reach temperatures as low as −18 °C. The hybrid Hymenocallis x festalis (a cross between Hymenocallis calathina and Elisena longipetala) can also be planted outside in sheltered parts of south and western England, but it must still be protected against frosts.

Pre-packed bulbs are purchased in the autumn onwards and should be planted from November to January. They like good drainage and will grow well in a soil rich with organic matter. For those of us who are trying to grow spider lilies in a cooler, northern European climate then in all fairness you will be better off growing them in pots so that they can be bought in under protection over the winter.

Plant them into 6-8 inch pots using a good quality potting compost such as John Innes 'No2'. The neck of each bulb should be just above the surface of the compost.

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SPIDER LILY - Hymenocallis species and cultivars
THE BLACK LILY - Lilium 'Landini'
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THE GIANT HIMALAYAN LILY - Cardiocrinum giganteum
THE GLORY LILY - Gloriosa rothschildiana
The Golden Foxtail lily - Eremurus bungei
The Hardy Spider Lily
THE SEA DAFFODIL - Pancratium maritimum
The Stargazer Lily

CORDYLINE TREE

Cordyline tree
The Cordyline tree - Cordyline australis is a popular, small-growing specimen tree for both garden and amenity use. Commonly known as the cabbage tree, you can expect it to grow up to 20 metres tall and 10 ft wide in northern European gardens. It is very popular as an ornamental tree in Europe, Great Britain and the United States due to its considerable cold tolerance and exotic, palm-like structure.

Cordyline tree
Native to the forest margins, river banks and swamps of New Zealand, the largest known specimen is found at Pakawau, Golden Bay. It is believed to be between 400 to 500 years old, and stands an impressive 56 ft in height with a 30 ft circumference at the base.

The highly perfumed flowers are produced in spring and early summer on large, dense panicles which can be up to 3 feet in length. The individual flowers are only about 0.2 inches wide and once pollinated will produce a white berry no more than 1/4 inch in diameter.

The blooms are particularly attractive to honey bees and in the UK the fruit is a favourite of starlings.

Cordyline tree
The cordyline tree will grow well in any fertile, well-drained soil. They are tolerant of exposure to strong winds in coastal areas and will do well position in full sun or semi-shade. Water Cordyline trees freely over the summer but just keep moist over the winter.

You do not need to prune cordylines, but you can cut of the tops of leggy plans which will promote new growth from below the cut and from the ground.

The indigenous maori people know the Cordyline australis as tī kōuka, and used the tree as a source of food. The stems and fleshy rhizomes of Cordyline australis are high in natural sugars and were steam-cooked in earth ovens to produce kāuru, a carbohydrate-rich food used to sweeten other foods. When the growing tips or leaf hearts are stripped of leaves they can be eaten raw or cooked as a vegetable

The leaves of the Cordyline australis also provided a tough, durable fibre that could be used to make amongst other things textiles, anchor ropes, fishing lines and baskets.

Cordyline australis and its cultivars 'Sundance', 'Torbay Dazzler', and 'Torbay Red' have all received the Award of Garden Merit (AGM) from the Royal Horticultural Society.

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HOW TO GROW SWEET CHESTNUT
HOW TO GROW YUCCA ELEPHANTIPES
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MINIATURE COCONUT PALM - Lytocaryum weddellianum
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THE DRAGON BLOOD TREE
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WINTERSWEET - Chimonanthus praecox

HOW TO GROW CORDYLINE AUSTRALIS

How to grow Cordyline australis

Cordyline is a small genus containing approximately 15 species of evergreen trees and shrubs native to New Zealand, Australia, India and South America. However the species that is by far the most cultivated for garden and landscape use is Cordyline australis, otherwise known as the 'cabbage palm' or 'cabbage tree'.

Cordyline australis is a small, conspicuous tree that forms from a single truck bearing a number of stout ascending branches. The older the tree the more branches are produced each branch is crowned by a large dense mass of long sword-like leaves. The flowers are small, creamy-white and particularly fragrant making them a favourite of honey bees. The flowers are produced on one or more large terminal panicles in the early summer and will last up to six weeks. Once flowering is over the branch holding the flower will break to produce further branches.

How to grow Cordyline australis
Growing up to 25ft tall and 6-10ft wide, Cordyline australis is a slow growing species, but despite its tropical and subtropical origins it is surprisingly hardy and as such is a favourite choice for creating a tropical effect in colder, northern European climates.

Cordyline australis will grow well in any fertile, well-drained garden soil. They prefer a sunny position but will also do well in partial shade. They are tolerant to exposed regions with strong winds and even salt spray but foliage will suffer a certain amount for burning at the tips.

To get the most out of your cordyline provide a liquid fertiliser every 10 days or so from May to September.

Water cordylines freely over the summer but only keep moist over winter. They are capable of going down to - 4 to 7 degrees Celsius but any further and they will require protection to prevent permanent cold damage.

Cordyline australis was brought into commercial production in 1823 and received its Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society in 1953.

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HOW TO GROW PHOENIX CANARIENSIS
HOW TO GROW THE FRANGIPANI TREE- Plumeria rubra var. acutifolia
HOW TO GROW SWEET CHESTNUT
HOW TO GROW YUCCA ELEPHANTIPES
HOW TO GROW YUCCA GLORIOSA 'VARIEGATA'
MINIATURE COCONUT PALM - Lytocaryum weddellianum
THE DRAGON BLOOD TREE
THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo
WINTERSWEET - Chimonanthus praecox

HOW MANY CALORIES ARE IN A POTATO?

How many calories are there in a potato?



Potatoes are one of the great British staple foods, and extremely versatile as a cooking ingredient. Boiled, baked, mashed, sauteed or fried we can't get enough of them, but are they good for us or will they make you fat? Of course, whatever you decide to fry in lard and then eat isn't going to be considered a particularly healthy choice, but is the problem with the lard or is it with the potato?

To find out the difference check out the calorific results below.

Calorie and Nutrition Values for 100g of Potatoes

Calories75
Protein2
Carbohydrate16.8
Fat0.2
Fibre1.3


Compare it to 100g chip shop chips and the number change rather dramatically

LAVENDER AS HEDGING PLANTS

Lavender as hedging plants - http://www.pinterest.com/pin/430586414345669776/





WANT TO BUY LAVENDER SEEDS? THEN CLICK HERE FOR THE 'SEEDS OF EADEN' SEED SHOP

When you think of hedging plants most people will overlook lavender as a suitable candidate. However with its fragrant, crisp foliage and ornamental flowers lavender is ideal for both formal and informal hedges although formal hedges will require more clipping to keep in shape, which will also prevent flowering.

Lavender hedging plants
The lavender genus contains 28 species of evergreen shrubs. The following selection are the best for creating low-growing hedges:

Lavandula angustifolia
Lavandula nana atropurpurea
Lavandula officinalis
Lavandula spica
Lavandula spica 'Hidcote'
Lavandula vera
Lavandula stoechas

Note 1. Lavandula angustifolia, spica and officinalis are all pseudonyms for the same plant commonly known as Old English lavender'.

Note 2. Be aware that Lavenders spica 'Hidcote' and nana atropurpurea are also the same plant.

Note 3. Lavandula vera is generally considered to be just a more compact form of Lavandula spica

Lavender as hedging plants
Lavender hedges are best planted between April and May as the soil is warming up. They will thrive in any ordinary, well-drained soil in a sunny position. Set your plants 9-12 inches apart, or 19 inches apart for larger cultivars. They are even happy to grow in poor, chalky or alkaline soils.

On heavier soils lavender can be fairly short-lived and become woody at the base. To prolong the life of your lavender on heavy soils, dig in plenty of organic matter and gravel to improve the drainage. Whatever your soil type plant your lavender hedge on a ridge to keep the base of the plants out of wet soil.

Prune new hedges to remove any dead flowering stems and lightly trim the plants to shape over the summer. Established hedges should be clipped to shape during March or April.

Lavender hedges are relatively pest and disease free although you can be prone to cuckoo spit in the spring.

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HERBS FOR ANXIETY RELIEF


Herbs for anxiety relief


No-body likes to feel anxious, and while feeling anxious can be perfectly normal some people find it hard to control their worries. Their feelings of anxiety are more constant and if steps are not taken it can end up affecting their daily life.

Anxiety is the main symptom of several conditions, including panic disorder, phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder (social phobia).

As with all other drugs, always read the label and if in doubt consult a physician first.

St John’s Wort - Hypericum perforatum

Herbs for anxiety relief
St John's wort is widely known as a herbal treatment for depression.

Its effectiveness is due to the inhibition of reuptake of certain neurotransmitters. Studies have shown that St John’s Wort can be an effective remedy for mild to moderate depression without the side effects of more conventional antidepressants.

Be aware that you should not take St John’s Wort if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and that St John’s Wort is not suitable for children. It can also interfere with prescribed medication.

Valerian - Valeriana officinalis

Herbs for anxiety relief
Valerian is a herb or dietary supplement prepared from roots of the plant. the crude extract of its root has sedative and anxiolytic effects. It can also be classified as a drug since its consumption produces a sedative or medicinal effect, while it is not exclusively a type of food.

It is most often used to treat insomnia and as an alternative for sedatives, such as benzodiazepines in the treatment of certain anxiety disorders.

Valerian should not be taken at the same time as sleeping pills or tranquilizers, although it can be combined with other herbs such as camomile, melissa or passionflower. Again, do not take if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and valerian is not suitable for children. Valerian should not be taken before driving or any other situation where you need to be alert.

Passionflower - Passiflora incarnata and Passiflora edulis

Herbs for anxiety relief
Passion flower leaves and roots have a long history of use among Native Americans in North America which were then adapted by early European colonists.

The fresh or dried leaves of the passionflower are used to make a tea that is used for insomnia, hysteria, and epilepsy. Once dried, the leaves can also be smoked.

Once again, do not take passionflower if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and that passionflower is not suitable for children.

Rhodiola rosea

Herbs for anxiety relief
Rhodiola rosea has been used for centuries in Russia and Scandinavia to cope with the cold Siberian climate and stressful life. It is also used in traditional Chinese medicine, where it is called hóng jǐng tiān.

Rhodiola rosea is effective for improving mood and alleviating depression and studies on human subjects have shown that it improves physical and mental performance, and may even reduce fatigue. However, while there is support for it having antidepressant effects, Rhodiola rosea is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to cure, treat, or prevent any disease. It is worth mentioning that it is recognised as an official medicine in Russia and Scandinavia for treating fatigue, memory loss and poor concentration.

Do not take Rhodiola rosea if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and that Rhodiola rosea is not suitable for children.

Chamomile - Matricaria chamomilla (synonym: Matricaria recutita)

Herbs for anxiety relief
Chamomile is commonly used to make a herb infusion that can help to induce sleep. It can be taken as an herbal tea, two teaspoons of dried flower per cup of tea, which should be steeped for 10 to 15 minutes while covered to avoid evaporation of the volatile oils.

Some compounds in chamomile bind to the same brain receptors as drugs like Valium.There is also evidence to support the claim that chamomile possesses anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) properties and may have clinical applications in the treatment of stress and insomnia.

Because chamomile has been known to cause uterine contractions that can invoke miscarriage, the U.S. National Institutes of Health recommends that pregnant and nursing mothers not consume chamomile.

Lemon balm - Melissa officinalis

Herbs for anxiety relief
Lemon balm has been used at least since the Middle Ages to reduce stress and anxiety, and also to help with sleep. In traditional Austrian medicine, lemon balm leaves have been prescribed as a tea or as an essential oil application for the treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, nervous system, liver, and bile.

Lemon balm is also used medicinally as an herbal tea as a mild sedative, or calming agent and at least one study has found it to be effective at reducing stress.

Be aware though that some studies have found that taking too much lemon balm can actually make you more anxious.

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